Grow Hawaii

 

About Grow Hawaii

Grow Hawaii is a project of the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS) in partnership with the Hawaii State Departments of Education & Agriculture, and the Ulupono Initiative.

This was the website for Grow Hawaii. The content below is from the site's 2012 archived pages.

Over the next three years, Grow Hawaii will use a variety of strategies to significantly enrich the educational dialogue in all private and public schools statewide concerning the urgency for growing food in the islands. Beginning with the belief that the betterment of humankind is inherently possible and that schools are a prominent force for good, Grow Hawai’i and its partners aspire to create lifelong “buy local, eat local” consumers by engaging students, starting in elementary school, in exploration, experimentation, and action-oriented problem-based learning that will foster consideration of the origins of and their relationship with island grown food and the social systems and values we will need to create a more sustainable way of life. Simultaneously, we aspire to document this story and share it with all who are interested, allowing the voices of students to chart a course to the future and be in the vanguard of those leading the way.

Grow Hawaii is a project of the Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS) in partnership with the Hawaii State Departments of Education & Agriculture, and the Ulupono Initiative. Over the next three years, Grow Hawaii will use a variety of startegies to enrich the educational dialogue in all private and public schools statewide concerning the urgency for growing food in the islands.

Participating Schools:

Academy of the Pacific
American Renaissance Academy
Ewa Makai Middle School
Hongwanji Mission School
Honolulu Waldorf School
‘Iolani School
Kamaile Academy
Kamehameha Schools – Kapalama Campus
Punahou School
Sacred Hearts Academy
Saint Louis School
St. Anthony School – Kailua
St. Mark Lutheran School
University Laboratory School
Windward Nazarene Academy

Farm to Preschool program in Kaua’i

Starting Fall of 2011, all preschool keiki on the island of Kaua’i will get to learn about healthy food with their own hands. According to Tiana Kamen of Malama Kaua’i, the Federal officer from the Center for Disease Control was there to preview the program loved every moment of it. He also helped make paper pots and plant papayas too! Click on the link below to read the article in The Garden Island Newspaper about the Farm to Keiki Preschool Program that is about to launch on Kaua’i!

Grow Hawaii featuring Kamaile Academy

Grow hawaii, a new project launched in 2010 seeks to engage students in action oriented problem based learning that addresses nutrition and food security as well the social systems and values needed to create a more sustainable way of life.
13 participating schools will build their own school gardens and engage students in dialog around the origins of and the relationship with island grown food.

Transcript:

Jenna Ishii, Director of Grow Hawaii: “The long term goal for this program is to have a garden in every school in Hawaii: Public, private, and charter. A garden teacher in every school in Hawaii and to have them actually be part of the staff. Its not a side thing, its not ‘the science teacher does gardening on the side’ anymore. It’s ‘I am a garden teacher and I am a big part of the school.’ Thats the long term goal. Right now we are taking mini steps. So weve adopted 13 schools and we’re gonna stay with them for 3 years and really dedicate our resources, learn with them, and stick with them for three years to make a really successfu model. And hopefully at the end of those 3 years we’ve shown a really good example of how when teachers come together, when school chefs come together, and heads believe in the idea, and when kids grow the movement and it comes from them that it can be really successful and we can be models for other schools on Oahu and on the other islands.”

Glen Kila, Kamaile Academy, Former Chief Executive: “Getting the children to feel the mother earth is very important to learning. What we found out is that when students have hands on activities like planting a seed and watching it grow. It kind of makes them feel to take care or Malama the Aina. That was important because by Malama or taking care of fruits, and trees, and plants they take care of themselves.”

Gabe Nakashima, Kamaile Academy, 7th-9th Grade Teacher: “Basically what we are trying to do is to get more kids more concious about the production and consumtion cycle. By incorporating composting and planting and giving kids an opportunity to pick plants and eat em and see the cycle come full circle then we’re kind of closing the gap between production and consumption.”

Nicole LaPrade, Kamaile Academy, 7th-9th Grade Teacher: “This is our school garden class and we have 7th and 8th graders. They’ve been working on vermi-composting and setting up a compost system here at our school. We get food trimmings from our salad bar at school from the cafeteria 2 to 3 times a week and we feed our worms. Today were gonna be sharing what we are doing with 1st 2nd and 3rd graders. Theyre gonna be coming up with their class at the end of the day. In groups our students are gonna be teaching them about what they learned in vermi-composting.”

Student: “When we feed them they eat the food, theyre gonna poop the food out on it, and when they do that thats gonna be fertilizer. When we put their poop on planyts it becomes food, nutrition.”

Gabe Nakashima: “With this effort of being a green school we want every student at Kamaile to help us go green and working in the garden and working towards sustainability. Eating our own food and things like that.”

Jenna Ishii: “It was 10 years ago when I graduated and I didnt have the opportunity to know where my food came from. For me its looking 10 years down the road about my children and what Im gonna want for them. And I hope that we start this program now in 10 years every school will have a garden program. And my kids can learn where food comes from again. So Im concerned for myself as a citizen of Hawaii that 90% of our food is imported and our energy… but more so for the next generation and what theyre gonna be facing. I think we still have time to fix that. If we start now… and we are. its happening.”

 

 

GrowHI.org